Celebrating Life Through Organic Electronic Vibrations

We are pleased to share our second edition of our international artist interview series for Symbiosis Gathering.  We have been fortunate to catch up with Australian bass producer Bumble who travels globally offering his unique earth-bass soundscapes. Max has performed at Symbiosis Gathering for consecutive years (2015-2016) and continues to impress festival audiences world-wide through is funky dance floor flavor. His intention for reconnecting to nature and all life on earth is beautifully reflected in his music production. We are grateful to have had a chance to ask some questions about his musical process and his experience as a cross-cultural performer. Enjoy!

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Breaking Borders: Symbiosis is a unique global gathering, what makes it special to you and how does it stand out among other similar events?

Bumble: Festival culture across the planet is thriving and the communities that inhabit these environments are engaged in everything that is on offer. Amongst the thousands of festivals I have participated in, last year’s Symbiosis Gathering was my peak experience not only from an artist’s perspective, but from a festival participant perspective. Last year I caught amazing workshops, witnessed Saul Williams do spoken word, caught a plethora of musical genres that moved me on elaborate stage design. I was dazzled by epic large artwork. and surrounded by the most colorful friendly people. Unlike some other events where FOMO (fear of missing out) on what’s happening over there in another area sometime guides my movements, at Symbiosis I always felt in the right spot at the right time. It was magic.

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Your music has become quite popular in the USA (primarily on the west coast). What’s your opinion on that? Why do you think the Australian bass scene has become so attractive here?

Sitting in my studio set deep into a national park north of Sydney, it never dawns on me in the moment that the audio ripples that are created there would fan out across the planet. But it does. I am blown away by the reality that people dig my music and the great platform that creates for the stories I want to tell. Generally speaking there are some truly talented folks in Australia making bass music and they deserve all the attention they get, and some that you have not yet heard of that will be gracing your ears soon. Aside from the talent, I think Australia and the USA have been aligned for decades and the flow back and forth of culture has been fluid during this period.

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What is the significance of your chosen artist name “Bumble”? You seem to feel strongly about the consciousness surrounding bees? How did that come about?

The alias Bumble was gifted to me by some friends during a late evening/early morning 10 years ago. It has shifted from its previous intention which defined me as a busy bee, into a platform to express my feelings about this amazing world that we live in. My respect for this planet and all its organisms, including birds, bees, humans, plants, trees and fungi’s is profound and I actively engage a positive relationship with her. Through all my projects including my bush regeneration business in Australia to the tree planting festivals we produce and the stories I tell in my music I like to help others connect with the amazing world we live together with.

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Your music contains a lot of organic instrumentation and vocals, how does it feel to fuse acoustic sounds into your intricate electronic production?

I love working with organic instruments. My musical journey saw me first playing in Punk, Hardcore and Ska bands and my first instrument that I played (although badly), the Trumpet. I went on to play a lot of guitar in a string of bands that would occasionally tour Australia. There is so much grit and form in organic instruments and I love recording and manipulating these to compliment my electronic creations. I have always written/co-written all the vocal content for the concept albums, that my good friend and actor Steven Kennedy helps mouth to tell the stories on my full length albums. These interludes form a storyline that I love sharing. I will continue to do so, stay tuned for a full length release prior to the Symbiosis Eclipse 2017.

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What’s you opinion on the independent music and art scene today, specifically within global festival culture? Do you see festival culture functioning in a way that challenges to “break down” social norms?

Independent music within the bass festival scene, is show heavy. Meaning that living from your music is dependent on playing shows often. This is great for some, not for others, and can change over time. It is how it is. And for me I cherish the opportunity that this facilitates. I love to travel and share stories and I have met many inspiring people over the years. I am impressed by the solid arts culture that has evolved on the west coast. It is unlike the rest of the world and you should be proud of the flourishing new renaissance.

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Festival culture has become very conscious of itself and is providing new stepping stones for change in the real world. Through combining arts and music with workshops and other world improving culture the festival scene has become a starting point for the change we want to see in the world. I think we are kidding ourselves if we think that the movement stops there. Our events need to surpass “leave no trace” into “leave a trace”, beyond personal development into the real world at the festival sites and at home. Festivals that put more back into the sites they inhabit and involving the participants of the festival in this improvement empowers them to take that home into their own communities at home.

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Many of your tracks and albums contain deep concepts surrounding nature consciousness. How much does the natural environment influence you and your music? What has inspired you to blend biology into a your productions?

I have always been of the bush. Spent all my time in the forest. At some point post my active direct activism era, I completed a environmental science degree, did a year conservation work in Ecuador, and since then have started my own bush regeneration business, growing this to work with 20 of my friends to deliver healthy ecosystems for the benefit of flora and fauna in national parks and council bushland around Sydney, Australia. Beyond that the positive action tree planting music festival that I co-direct, “Regrowth Festival” (www.re-gen.org.au) has grown to connect youth culture with the environment through enticing youth out through great music and entertainment and give them the opportunity to be part of a positive successful environmental project. It is amazing how the empowerment of being part of a positive project can flow on into people’s lives and can create a wave. I am of nature and therefore it feeds through into my music. I can’t help it.

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What is one “life changing” moment or realization you have had in the world since becoming an international musician?

That we are all dancing around the world in these super tight knit strong communities, and that if we choose to harness this energy locally and globally, we can change the world.

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Any new projects, tours, concepts to look forward to you?

After the North America tour finishes in Hawaii, I will follow on through into the Australian Summer. Some solid time in the studio with the new album out prior to July 2017, before Symbiosis “Eclipse Festival”. And then be looking to build a solid tour up for the 2017 in North America and beyond.

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